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Dead Sea Scrolls Staying in Israel

Israel Radio is reporting that according to the Israeli newspaper Maariv, a decision has been made to not ship the Dead Sea Scrolls abroad for any exhibitions because of the recent legal steps taken by Jordan and the Palestinians to try and get possession of them. See here for some background.

3 Responses to “Dead Sea Scrolls Staying in Israel”

  1. 1
    S.:

    They’re letting themselves become the art thieves they’re being accused of. It’s great to have the Mona Lisa in your living room, but at a certain point if you’ve got it you want to show it off.

    I think Israel should think long and hard if it really wants to be the pinball or the flippers.

  2. 2
    jdub:

    S.

    If they make them available for study in Israel, then they are not being art thieves. Nobody has asked France to move the Mona Lisa from the Louvre to go on a traveling tour. If Israeli generals can’t get off a plane in London for fear of being arrested, and Palestinians/Jordanians are making legal claims, why not keep them in Israel and allow reputable scholars access to them?

    jdub

  3. 3
    S.:

    The Mona Lisa was in NYC about 40 years ago.

    I’m not comparing Israel to art thieves in the sense that they don’t hold them legitimately. I’m comparing them to art thieves in the sense that they’re allowing themselves to be treated that way, having to hide the booty as if they’ve stolen it, rather than do with it as they please as rightful owners do. They’re letting themselves be painted into a corner. I’m aware of the current climate. Yet more than actually trying to acquire the DSS, I suspect that Jordan et al is really trying to control and isolate Israel in this manner. Israel has nothing to do but acquiesce to its isolation? I don’t buy it.

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